3 years ago

Hemostatic function to regulate perioperative bleeding in patients undergoing spinal surgery: A prospective observational study

Katsushi Takeshita, Teruaki Endo, Tsukasa Ohmori, Satoshi Nishimura, Hirokazu Inoue, Asuka Sakata, Atsushi Kimura

by Atsushi Kimura, Tsukasa Ohmori, Asuka Sakata, Teruaki Endo, Hirokazu Inoue, Satoshi Nishimura, Katsushi Takeshita

Although bleeding is a common complication of surgery, routine laboratory tests have been demonstrated to have a low ability to predict perioperative bleeding. Better understanding of hemostatic function during surgery would lead to identification of high-risk patients for bleeding. Here, we aimed to elucidate hemostatic mechanisms to determine perioperative bleeding. We prospectively enrolled 104 patients undergoing cervical spinal surgery without bleeding diathesis. Blood sampling was performed just before the operation. Volumes of perioperative blood loss were compared with the results of detailed laboratory tests assessing primary hemostasis, secondary hemostasis, and fibrinolysis. Platelet aggregations induced by several agonists correlated with each other, and only two latent factors determined inter-individual difference. Platelet aggregability independently determined perioperative bleeding. We also identified low levels of plasminogen-activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and α2-plasmin inhibitor to be independent risk factors for intraoperative and postoperative bleeding, respectively. Most important independent factor to determine postoperative bleeding was body weight. Of note, obese patients with low levels of PAI-1 became high-risk patients for bleeding during surgery. Our data suggest that bleeding after surgical procedure may be influenced by inter-individual differences of hemostatic function including platelet function and fibrinolysis, even in the patients without bleeding diathesis.

Publisher URL: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article

DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0179829

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