3 years ago

Deconstruction of Corticospinal Circuits for Goal-Directed Motor Skills

Deconstruction of Corticospinal Circuits for Goal-Directed Motor Skills
Kuan Hong Wang, Hengfu Yang, Yiming Zhang, Philip R. Williams, Xinjian Li, Xuhua Wang, Noaf S.A. Alwahab, Yu Zhang, Zicong Zhang, Bin Yu, Kush Kapur, Haixia Ding, Yuanyuan Liu, Charles R. Gerfen, Zhigang He, Mengying Chen

Summary

Corticospinal neurons (CSNs) represent the direct cortical outputs to the spinal cord and play important roles in motor control across different species. However, their organizational principle remains unclear. By using a retrograde labeling system, we defined the requirement of CSNs in the execution of a skilled forelimb food-pellet retrieval task in mice. In vivo imaging of CSN activity during performance revealed the sequential activation of topographically ordered functional ensembles with moderate local mixing. Region-specific manipulations indicate that CSNs from caudal or rostral forelimb area control reaching or grasping, respectively, and both are required in the transitional pronation step. These region-specific CSNs terminate in different spinal levels and locations, therefore preferentially connecting with the premotor neurons of muscles engaged in different steps of the task. Together, our findings suggest that spatially defined groups of CSNs encode different movement modules, providing a logic for parallel-ordered corticospinal circuits to orchestrate multistep motor skills.

Publisher URL: http://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(17)30939-X

DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2017.08.014

You might also like
Never Miss Important Research

Researcher is an app designed by academics, for academics. Create a personalised feed in two minutes.
Choose from over 15,000 academics journals covering ten research areas then let Researcher deliver you papers tailored to your interests each day.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.