3 years ago

Contact Dependence and Velocity Crossover in Friction between Microscopic Solid/Solid Contacts

Contact Dependence and Velocity Crossover in Friction between Microscopic Solid/Solid Contacts
Alexis Chennevière, Joshua D. McGraw, Antoine Niguès, Alessandro Siria
Friction at the nanoscale differs markedly from that between surfaces of macroscopic extent. Characteristically, the velocity dependence of friction between apparent solid/solid contacts can strongly deviate from the classically assumed velocity independence. Here, we show that a nondestructive friction between solid tips with radius on the scale of hundreds of nanometers and solid hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers has a strong velocity dependence. Specifically, using laterally oscillating quartz tuning forks, we observe a linear scaling in the velocity at the lowest accessed velocities, typically hundreds of micrometers per second, crossing over into a logarithmic velocity dependence. This crossover is consistent with a general multicontact friction model that includes thermally activated breaking of the contacts at subnanometric elongation. We find as well a strong dependence of the friction on the dimensions of the frictional probe.

Publisher URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b03076

DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b03076

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