3 years ago

Emerging Chemistry Strategies for Engineering Native Chromatin

Emerging Chemistry Strategies for Engineering Native Chromatin
Yael David, Tom W. Muir
Chromosomes present one of most challenging of all substrates for biochemical study. This is because genomic DNA is physically associated with an astonishing collection of nuclear factors, which serve to not only store the nucleic acid in a stable form, but also grant access to the information it encodes when needed. Understanding this complex molecular choreography is central to the field of epigenetics. One of the great challenges in this area is to move beyond correlative type information, which is now in abundant supply, to the point where we can truly connect the dots at the molecular level. Establishing such causal relationships requires precise manipulation of the covalent structure of chromatin. Tools for this purpose are currently in short supply, creating an opportunity that, as we will argue in this Perspective, is well suited to the sensibilities of the chemist.

Publisher URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jacs.7b03430

DOI: 10.1021/jacs.7b03430

You might also like
Discover & Discuss Important Research

Keeping up-to-date with research can feel impossible, with papers being published faster than you'll ever be able to read them. That's where Researcher comes in: we're simplifying discovery and making important discussions happen. With over 19,000 sources, including peer-reviewed journals, preprints, blogs, universities, podcasts and Live events across 10 research areas, you'll never miss what's important to you. It's like social media, but better. Oh, and we should mention - it's free.

  • Download from Google Play
  • Download from App Store
  • Download from AppInChina

Researcher displays publicly available abstracts and doesn’t host any full article content. If the content is open access, we will direct clicks from the abstracts to the publisher website and display the PDF copy on our platform. Clicks to view the full text will be directed to the publisher website, where only users with subscriptions or access through their institution are able to view the full article.