3 years ago

Elevated Choline-Containing Compound Levels in Rapid Cycling Bipolar Disorder

Jeffrey A Stanley, Giovana B Zunta-Soares, Jair C Soares, Sudhakar Selvaraj, Bo Cao, Benson Mwangi, Ives Cavalcante Passos

Previous studies have found increased levels of choline-containing compounds (ie, glycerophosphocholine plus phosphocholine (GPC+PC)) in bipolar disorder using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS), especially in bipolar I disorder (BD-I). Increased levels of GPC+PC suggest alterations in the membrane phospholipids metabolism in bipolar disorder. Rapid cycling (RC) bipolar disorder is considered as a severe course of bipolar disorder, but it is unclear whether rapid cycling bipolar disorder is linked to highly altered membrane phospholipid metabolism. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the regional extent of elevated GPC+PC were greater in BD-I patients with rapid cycling compared to BD-I patients without rapid cycling and healthy controls. Using a multi-voxel 1H MRS approach at 3Tesla with high spatial resolution and absolute quantification, GPC+PC levels from the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), caudate and putamen of 16 RC BD-I, 34 non-RC BD-I and 44 healthy controls were assessed. We found significantly elevated GPC+PC levels in ACC, putamen and caudate of RC BD-I patients compared to healthy controls (P<0.005) and in ACC compared to non-RC BD-I patients (P<0.05). These results suggest greater alteration of membrane phospholipid metabolisms in rapid cycling BD-I compared to non-rapid-cycling BD-I.

Publisher URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/npp.2017.39

DOI: 10.1038/npp.2017.39

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