3 years ago

Genetic structure and demographic history of Lymantria dispar (Linnaeus, 1758) (Lepidoptera: Erebidae) in its area of origin and adjacent areas

Genetic structure and demographic history of Lymantria dispar (Linnaeus, 1758) (Lepidoptera: Erebidae) in its area of origin and adjacent areas
Sang Hoon Han, Tae Hwa Kang, Heung Sik Lee
We analyzed the population genetic structure and demographic history of 20 Lymantria dispar populations from Far East Asia using microsatellite loci and mitochondrial genes. In the microsatellite analysis, the genetic distances based on pairwise FST values ranged from 0.0087 to 0.1171. A NeighborNet network based on pairwise FST genetic distances showed that the 20 regional populations were divided into five groups. Bayesian clustering analysis (K = 3) demonstrated the same groupings. The populations in the Korean Peninsula and adjacent regions, in particular, showed a mixed genetic pattern. In the mitochondrial genetic analysis based on 98 haplotypes, the median-joining network exhibited a star shape that was focused on three high-frequency haplotypes (Haplotype 1: central Korea and adjacent regions, Group 1; Haplotype 37: southern Korea, Group 2; and Haplotype 90: Hokkaido area, Group 3) connected by low-frequency haplotypes. The mismatch distribution dividing the three groups was unimodal. In the neutral test, Tajima's D and Fu's FS tests were negative. We can thus infer that the Far East Asian populations of L. dispar underwent a sudden population expansion. Based on the age expansion parameter, the expansion time was inferred to be approximately 53,652 years before present (ybp) for Group 1, approximately 65,043 ybp for Group 2, and approximately 76,086 ybp for Group 3. We propose that the mixed genetic pattern of the inland populations of Far East Asia is due to these expansions and that the inland populations of the region should be treated as valid subspecies that are distinguishable from other subspecies by genetic traits. We analyzed the population genetic structure and demographic history of 20 Lymantria dispar populations from Far East Asia using microsatellite loci and mitochondrial genes. In the microsatellite analysis, the populations in the Korean peninsula and adjacent regions showed a mixed genetic pattern. In the mitochondrial genetic analysis, we can infer that the Far East Asian populations of Lymantria dispar underwent a sudden population expansion.

Publisher URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/doi

DOI: 10.1002/ece3.3467

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