3 years ago

Bee cognition

Bee cognition
Lars Chittka

Summary

Maeterlinck did not mean to suggest that honeybees rival humans in intelligence — rather he saw in the bee a qualitatively different form of intelligence, tailored to the challenges of a profoundly different kind of society and lifestyle. Insects are strange "aliens from inner space", with sensory and cognitive worlds wholly different from our own. The 19th century discovery that ants can detect ultraviolet light triggered a golden age in the exploration of the diversity of sensory systems of insects (and indeed other animals), identifying such abilities as magnetic compasses, electrosensitivity, polarization vision, and peculiar locations for sense organs such as the infrared sensors on the abdomens of some beetles or photoreceptors on the genitalia of some butterflies. Could insect minds be equally strange and diverse?

Publisher URL: http://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(17)31017-5

DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2017.08.008

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